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  1. Guide Hybrid Factories in Latin America: Japanese Management Transferred
  2. Abo, Tetsuo 1937-
  3. Table of contents
  4. More titles to consider
  5. Hybrid Factories in Latin America: Japanese Management Transferred
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Javascript is not enabled in your browser. Enabling JavaScript in your browser will allow you to experience all the features of our site. Learn how to enable JavaScript on your browser. Explores the Latin American economy and management through the study of Japanese companies in countries such as Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. Based on detailed case studies, this volume offers a bird's eye view of foreign investments in Latin America. He has twenty-one years of international business experience at Furukawa Electric Company, a global Fortune-listed company, and has been a member of the Academy of International Business since His research focuses on Japanese management and production systems in an international context and management geography.

Yamazaki , W. Hao Newsan S.

Japan's Hidden South American Colonies (Nipo-Brasileiros and Peruano-Japon├ęs)

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Guide Hybrid Factories in Latin America: Japanese Management Transferred

Overview Explores the Latin American economy and management through the study of Japanese companies in countries such as Argentina, Brazil, and Mexico. Yamazaki Index. Show More. Average Review. Write a Review. Related Searches.

Adventures of a Japanese Businessman. Prepare to meet one of the unluckiest people in the world in this oversized, totally Prepare to meet one of the unluckiest people in the world in this oversized, totally wordless graphic novel from Spanish comics sensation Jose Domingo. Following a rigid four panel grid and an anything goes philosophy, Adventures of a Japanese Businessman The industrial architecture of Latin America underwent a significant change between and Agriculture, which accounted for 20 percent of GDP in , had dropped to 10 percent by , and this percentage remained unchanged thereafter.

Manufacturing industry, on the other hand, rose from 30 percent of GDP in to 37 percent in , and it was strongly influenced by the economic crisis that followed.

Abo, Tetsuo 1937-

This chapter aims to make a general historic survey of economic development and industrialization in the Latin American region. However, Japanese enterprises also made inroads into this field of industry from around the s and s. In this chapter we discuss the strategies of transnational corporations deeply involved in industrialization and its process in the region, referring to the actions of Japanese-affiliated companies as much as possible because it is the object of our book.

First of all, we will look back at the period of import substitution until around the s, including the historical background of industrialization.

Table of contents

Next, we will look at the heavy chemical industrialization the second import-substituting industrialization which proceeded at about a fast rate around the s from the late s , mainly focusing on the situation of the automobile and electrical-electronic industries. This chapter discusses similarities and differences of industrial relations systems 1 in Mexico, Brazil, and Argentina by examining the historical background of each country, a topic which the JMNESG have done research on in Latin America.

Next, this chapter provides an overview of the transformation of industrial relations in each society during the process of globalization: What kinds of effects will harsh competition in globalization make on industrial relations in each society? The process has involved significant structural reforms aimed at opening up their economies. Flows of trade and foreign direct investment are increasing in countries characterized by differing levels of development.


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  • Guide Hybrid Factories in Latin America: Japanese Management Transferred?

The resulting benefits have been diverse, and the human and institutional capabilities strengthened have also varied considerably. Nevertheless, the unfinished development process and the economic, social and political problems experienced in the Latin American region have led to an intensification of criticism directed at regional integration and free trade.

More titles to consider

It includes comparisons to the average JMPS application in hybrid factories worldwide and in the various global regions, and identifies the main characteristics of the Latin American pattern. Based on data from ten Japanese factories surveyed in and , this chapter will investigate the possibility of transfer of Japanese-style production systems into Mexico.

The chapters in Part 1 discussed the three Latin American countries covered in this book: the topics dealt in detail were the location of Brazil, the historical backgrounds, the macroeconomic trends, the direct investments by foreign countries, the social and labor environments and the framework for regional economic integration. Among the firms that were the subjects of this study, however, are some that were of significant interest in terms of quality.

Reflecting the modest investment from Japan in Argentina in both scale and number of enterprises, the number of firms covered in this study is limited. The main purpose of this chapter is to clarify the transfer of the Japanese production system into the two plants in Brazil and Argentina, based on field research. After that I evaluate the transferability of the system in South America.

Hybrid Factories in Latin America: Japanese Management Transferred

Toyota announced the construction of production facilities in Mexico in January and after that, it started production operations in Thus, it is one of the latest production plants for Toyota. At the same time, it is one of the smallest production plants, with the production capacity of 30, units per year, in Toyota group.

Aguascalientes Plant, the main plant of Nissan Mexicana, started its operations in